DPS Women in Astronomy Discussion Hour 2014 - Tucson, AZ

This event is an informal meeting for all interested parties. This means you do not have to be a woman to support women in science or be interested in learning some professional development tips, for yourself or to share with others :).

Date: Tuesday, November 11th Time: 12:00-1:30

Place: Arizona Ballroom 8 & 9 at the JW Marriott Starr Pass (Conference Venue)

Tentative Program: 12:00 Lunch Pickup 12:15 Start of Formal Program - Topic 1: Powerful Communication - Topic 2: Being an Ally 1:10 Discussion and Open Announcements Due to the generosity of the DPS committee (thank you!!), we will be able to provide boxed lunch this year! ****RSVPs must be received before Oct. 15th**** to ensure a lunch is ordered for you (we will get a few extras).

In 1952, the majority of the 1,000 employees at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory were men, and most of the women working on lab were in clerical positions. There were some exceptions, such as the women of the Computing Section, and three women who had technical positions in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. In addition to chemist Lois Taylor, seen in this photo, Julia Shedlesky also worked as a chemist and Luz Trent was a lab technician. Taylor began working at JPL in 1946. The Chemistry Section was involved in the development of new solid and liquid propellants, propellant evaluations and general studies on combustion processes in motors. 

This post was written for “Historical Photo of the Month,” a blog by Julie Cooper of JPL’s Library and Archives Group.

In 1952, the majority of the 1,000 employees at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory were men, and most of the women working on lab were in clerical positions. There were some exceptions, such as the women of the Computing Section, and three women who had technical positions in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. In addition to chemist Lois Taylor, seen in this photo, Julia Shedlesky also worked as a chemist and Luz Trent was a lab technician. Taylor began working at JPL in 1946. The Chemistry Section was involved in the development of new solid and liquid propellants, propellant evaluations and general studies on combustion processes in motors.  This post was written for “Historical Photo of the Month,” a blog by Julie Cooper of JPL’s Library and Archives Group. - See more at: http://blogs.jpl.nasa.gov/category/columns/sliceofhistory/#sthash.BGgOJzVP.dpufIn 1952, the majority of the 1,000 employees at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory were men, and most of the women working on lab were in clerical positions. There were some exceptions, such as the women of the Computing Section, and three women who had technical positions in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. In addition to chemist Lois Taylor, seen in this photo, Julia Shedlesky also worked as a chemist and Luz Trent was a lab technician. Taylor began working at JPL in 1946. The Chemistry Section was involved in the development of new solid and liquid propellants, propellant evaluations and general studies on combustion processes in motors.

This post was written for “Historical Photo of the Month,” a blog by Julie Cooper of JPL’s Library and Archives Group.

- See more at: http://blogs.jpl.nasa.gov/category/columns/sliceofhistory/#sthash.BGgOJzVP.dpuf

In 1952, the majority of the 1,000 employees at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory were men, and most of the women working on lab were in clerical positions. There were some exceptions, such as the women of the Computing Section, and three women who had technical positions in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. In addition to chemist Lois Taylor, seen in this photo, Julia Shedlesky also worked as a chemist and Luz Trent was a lab technician. Taylor began working at JPL in 1946. The Chemistry Section was involved in the development of new solid and liquid propellants, propellant evaluations and general studies on combustion processes in motors.

This post was written for “Historical Photo of the Month,” a blog by Julie Cooper of JPL’s Library and Archives Group.

- See more at: http://blogs.jpl.nasa.gov/category/columns/sliceofhistory/#sthash.BGgOJzVP.dpuf

In 1952, the majority of the 1,000 employees at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory were men, and most of the women working on lab were in clerical positions. There were some exceptions, such as the women of the Computing Section, and three women who had technical positions in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. In addition to chemist Lois Taylor, seen in this photo, Julia Shedlesky also worked as a chemist and Luz Trent was a lab technician. Taylor began working at JPL in 1946. The Chemistry Section was involved in the development of new solid and liquid propellants, propellant evaluations and general studies on combustion processes in motors.

This post was written for “Historical Photo of the Month,” a blog by Julie Cooper of JPL’s Library and Archives Group.

- See more at: http://blogs.jpl.nasa.gov/category/columns/sliceofhistory/#sthash.BGgOJzVP.dpuf

      Q&A with Dr. Phoebe Cohen - Astrobiology Magazine

Dr. Phoebe A. Cohen is a Professor of Geosciences at Williams College and is involved in numerous research projects with the NASA Astrobiology Program. Cohen studies the fossil record to uncover clues about the evolution of complex life on Earth.

gURLs in Space spoke to Cohen about how she became interested in astrobiology and the path that led her to professional success in science. Read the Q&A here.

Do you have any particular advice for young women in science?

Cohen: Science is not a boy thing or a girl thing, it’s a human thing…

Phoebe Cohen, Assistant Professor of Geosciences at Williams College. Credit: Williams College

      Call for papers: Personal stories from women in science

Does anyone out there have a story they want to tell about being a woman in science? If so, check out this new project being developed by Jessica Brinkworth at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and Marie-Claire Shanahan of University of Calgary:

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Please forward this call for essays to anyone you think might be interested in participating in such a project. We are seeking authors from a broad variety of fields and backgrounds.

The publication timeline is as follows:

September 10th 2014 – subject/title due
September 30th 2014 – abstract due
June 10th 2015– essays for review due
September 10th, 2015 – revised essays due

Hope to hear from you,

Jessica Brinkworth
Assistant Professor
Department of Anthropology (starting 2015)
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Urbana, Illinois, USA

Marie-Claire Shanahan
Associate Professor
Research Chair in Science Education and Public Engagement
Werklund School of Education, University of Calgary
Calgary, Alberta, Canada

      Mars Education Natural Events Fall 2014 Conference | Mars Education

Upcoming conference for educators interested in using Mars exploration in your curriculum! 

Credit: ASU

Special NASA team guests will be sharing about the newest discoveries on the Red Planet and highlight new classroom STEM tools.  In addition, STEM-related hands-on activities will showcased and ways to help educators extend their students’ learning will be shared. Conference participants will receive lesson plans and NASA materials. “

      Curtains of Fire on Io

Giant eruptions caught on tape (well… on telescope) are helping scientists like Imke de Pater, professor and chair of astronomy at UC Berkeley, understand Jupiter’s moon Io. Their work could also shed light on what conditions at the surface of the early Earth were like.

“We typically expect one huge outburst every one or two years, and they’re usually not this bright,” - Imke de Pater

Imke de Pater. Credit: UC Berkeley

Searching for ET

For anyone at NASA Ames:

Jill Tarter of the SETI Institute is talking today at the NASA Ames Research Center as part of the 2014 Summer Director’s Colloquium. Her talk, “Searching for ET: An Investment in Our Long Future” starts at 2pm PST.

It’s not being web broadcast (we’ll post a video if they put in online at a later date) - but you can follow the twitter feed at 

This is a cool entry from  the SpaceOut hangouts From NASA’s JPL & DNews. It features Dr. Amy Mainzer, Principal Investigator of NASA’s NEOWISE mission.

    "We have our first chance, our first capability of finding signs of life on another planet"

    - Sara Seager in reference to the James Webb Space Telescope